Indonesia Eats

Lontong (Indonesian Rice Cake)

Indonesian Rice CakeFirst and foremost, I’d like to say “Happy Thanksgiving to all Canadians”. This Monday is a Canadian Thanksgiving.

Let’s back to our topic here, lontong.  Lontong is a cylinder look of rice cake that is traditionally wrapped in banana leaf and boiled until solid. Thou the translation is rice cake, this lontong is not for dessert. It’s a kind of cooked rice substitution.

In Indonesian term, Lontong and Ketupat are loosely translated the same “rice cake”. The difference is the shape and wrapping materials. While lontong has a cylinder shape, ketupat is square. Please see my further explanation on ketupat.

Lontong accompanies many Indonesian dishes such as sate or satay, rendang, veggies or meat soup or stew with curry base. In Probolinggo, a small city where I was born, lontong is eaten with bakso (Indonesian meatball soup).

After several time I made lontong, I came to a conclusion. Don’t use jasmine rice for making lontong, but use long grain rice as it yields more solid lontong.

I was promising Marvellina of What To Cook Today to show my lontong mould here. These 2 moulds were brought from Indonesia. After using them plenty of times, they are getting unpresentable on the picture. There is a tip to make any stainless steel stuff clean again from Lena when she saw my ugly mould’s picture.

Lontong Mould
Submerge the stainless steel products for 30 minutes in a solution of white vinegar, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and salt mixture. Be careful when you are mixing them because the mixture can be foamed a lot. After that, scrub your stainless steel stuff with a steel scrubber.” Thanks Lena!
Lontong Collage
How to make lontong with the lontong mould:
– Roll each leaf (length wise with the green shiny side in, so your lontong will have slightly greenish color) into a cylinder.
– Open up two lids of the mould. Put the leaf cylinder into mould. Plug one lid on, fill rinsed and cleaned rice until half. Plug the other lid on. Ready to boil for approx. 3 – 4 hours.

Note:
– The lontong process with a mould takes longer than the one without. However, you will get more solid lontong and uniform shape.

– Before plugging the lids, you may want to put layer of pandan or banana leaf on.

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27 thoughts on “Lontong (Indonesian Rice Cake)”

  1. I thought Lontong is a vegetable curry dish and not the cake. We call the rice cake Ketupat in Singapore and rice cake in vegetable curry – Lontong.

  2. What to cook today

    Wow…THANK YOU SO MUCH Pepy! 🙂 This is great! My mom is coming pretty soon and I've already asked her to custom made this lol!!!!
    and Happy Thanksgiving btw. The lontong looks wonderful and sure is less messy than how I did it without the mould lol!

  3. Karen, I'm glad you enjoy it.

    M, If your mom has a chance to go to Jakarta, the moulds are sold at the markets.

    Ju, the reason why I love making it inside the banana leaves.

  4. Xiaolu @ 6 Bittersweets

    I actually like the rustic look of the mold, but I guess it's more practical to keep it clean 8). Thanks for introducing me to yet another completely unfamiliar food. I do so love to read about and try new things.

  5. What to cook today

    I just talked to her and she just told me that she found the lontong mould when she went to surabaya last week!! yayyy!!! I'm excited more than eating the lontong! lol! Thanks.

  6. Wow, you made your own lontong…!!! I haven't had lontong for a while. You're right, it tastes great with curry based dishes!

  7. I've seen something like this in Vietnamese delis. I love rice cooked in leaves like this because the rice takes on that wonderful herbal flavor and yes, even a blush of green tint, too.

  8. Thanks for the recipe Pepy. Lontong is usually sold in the night markets during Ramadhan. I quite miss, love it with rendang!

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  13. How do you keep the shape if you don’t have a mold? I’ve been missing lontong and aching for some good gado-gado and wanting to make my own. Any suggestions?

    1. First of all roll the banana leaves. Be sure you have more than couple layers to make firm roll. Tighten up one side with a toothpick. Fill the rinsed rice about 3/4 fro the height of the roll. Use a kind rice that is not easy to get mushy or too hard. In this case, I avoid using jasmine and basmati rice. You can use a combination of both but one of them only. Or I usually use regular long grain rice.
      After the filling process, tighten up another side. Ready to cook as usual. You can always use cold steamed rice then roll it with banan leaves or foil as your wrapper material. Tighten up then boil as usual. Good luck!

      1. Can or have you used red rice for this? If so, would the cooking time be longer if raw or if steamed would it turn out the same???

        1. Indonesia Eats

          Surely, you can use red rice but my suggestion. To be honest, I haven’t tried with red rice but when I cook red rice for steaming rice I soak the rice for 30 minutes before using it. So the same method will apply for making the lontong with red rice as well.

  14. Wow, we share the same hometown, Mbak Pep. I used to live in Sukokerto, small village near Kraksaan and their seafood products (especially the fresh squid with ink still intact) always be missed 😀

    1. Indonesia Eats

      I didn’t know where Sukokerto is until you told me it’s near Kraksaan. I lived in Probolinggo until I was 8 years old. Thanks for stopping by

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