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Ethiopian Food and Tradition

Ethiopian Alphabet

These pictures have been long overdue. Seven months ago when I still stayed in Boissevain, I was kinda craving for Ethiopian food. But, no Ethiopian restaurants in the province except in Winnipeg. Then, I read on the Brandon local newspaper that there would be the 7th Annual Lieutenant Governor’s Winter Festival in Brandon. The distance between Brandon and Boissevain is about an hour driving.

The festival’s concept was pretty much similar to Folklorama in Winnipeg. Just for your information, Folklorama is the largest and longest running multicultural event of its kind in the world!

Today, I just realized that I have had these pictures (make sure you see all the pictures below) when I went back to my old photo stocks on Flickr.

I was first got to know Ethiopian cuisine in 2008 when my husband and I went to the Ethiopian restaurant in our neighbourhood. Then, we felt in love with the food right away.

Traditional Ethiopian cuisine employs no pork of any kind, as most Ethiopians are either Ethiopian Orthodox Christians, Muslims or Jews, and are thus prohibited from eating pork.

Look how pretty the Massobs are! Massob/Mesob is an Ethiopian communal serving basket and made from woven grass.

Massob

Massob - Day 3 of 365 Ethiopian Giftware

 

When I entered the room and breathed in, the aroma rang a bell right away. Smell just like dupa in Indonesian or kemenyan in Javanese. It was incense that burned inside Kirkira (sorry if I misspelled).

Kirkira (I may spell this out wrong)
This was my portion of Injera, Wat and Tibs. Injera is an Ethiopian large sourdough flatbread, which is about 50 centimeters in diameter and made out of fermented teff flour; Wat is meat Stew, it can be chicken, lamb and/or beef; Tibs is sauteed vegetables.

Ethiopian Food on My Plate (Injera, Wat and Tibs)
Teff flour is a gluten-free flour substitute that you can use in any of your recipes calling for all-purpose flour. It has nutty flavor and adds a pleasant sweetness to any recipe.

First time, I had a goat stew at the Ethiopian restaurant, I was stunned. It did remind me of goat curry in Indonesia. For those who love South East Asian curries, you won’t have a hard time to like Ethiopian dishes.

Since I got to know Ethiopian tradition, I found similarity between Ethiopians and Indonesians. Traditionally, we eat the food with the right hand, no cutlery. Honestly, I sometimes do eat by hand at home :-P. The difference, the Ethiopians use injeera to pick up food. They also have small bowl with water and a slice of lime for washing the hand.

Use Your Right Hand, No Cutlery An Ethiopian Lady

 

Stay tune for my next post, Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony.

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21 thoughts on “Ethiopian Food and Tradition”

  1. Ju (The Little Teoch

    So very interesting! Ethiopian food is something completely foreign to me. And of all people to introduce it, it's Pepy of INDONESIA Eats! The irony! :)))

  2. I love Ethiopian food! We have a local authentic mom and pop style joint nearby that we used to frequent. In fact, I think I want to go now. Thanks fort sharing.

  3. Isn't that strange? Lately, I was thinking of trying my hand at making Injera and some of its accompanying stews! I am NOT kidding you, Pepy.. one of us must be telepathic. I'm still wondering where I can obtain teff flour and if there is a substitute for it. Lucky you got to try this!

  4. Ju (The Little Teochew)

    So very interesting! Ethiopian food is something completely foreign to me. And of all people to introduce it, it's Pepy of INDONESIA Eats! The irony! :)))

  5. I love Ethiopian food! We have a local authentic mom and pop style joint nearby that we used to frequent. In fact, I think I want to go now. Thanks fort sharing.

  6. Isn't that strange? Lately, I was thinking of trying my hand at making Injera and some of its accompanying stews! I am NOT kidding you, Pepy.. one of us must be telepathic. I'm still wondering where I can obtain teff flour and if there is a substitute for it. Lucky you got to try this!

  7. Xiaolu @ 6 Bitterswe

    I discovered Ethiopian food in college and have adored it ever since. Thankfully then I moved to D.C. which has a lot of restaurants and groceries that sell huge packs of freshly made injera even! Glad you're helping convert even more fans :).

  8. @Ju and Tigerfish: Ethiopian food is really tasty. I'm craving for more injera now@Anncoo: you can read the next post already. Thanks@Lisa: seriously if we love spicy food, we will enjoy this cuisine.@Foodiva: As I was saying on your blog, hopefully you can find the Bob's red mill brand for teff flour there. I myself don't have a hard time since there are some Ethiopian stores here.@Torviewtoronto: I do enjoy every multicultural events@Xialou: the more diverse our community we live on, the more opportunity we get to know other cultures and the more open our tastesbuds to other culture's foods. We are all lucky with that opportunity.

  9. Xiaolu @ 6 Bittersweets

    I discovered Ethiopian food in college and have adored it ever since. Thankfully then I moved to D.C. which has a lot of restaurants and groceries that sell huge packs of freshly made injera even! Glad you're helping convert even more fans :).

  10. @Ju and Tigerfish: Ethiopian food is really tasty. I'm craving for more injera now

    @Anncoo: you can read the next post already. Thanks

    @Lisa: seriously if we love spicy food, we will enjoy this cuisine.

    @Foodiva: As I was saying on your blog, hopefully you can find the Bob's red mill brand for teff flour there. I myself don't have a hard time since there are some Ethiopian stores here.

    @Torviewtoronto: I do enjoy every multicultural events

    @Xialou: the more diverse our community we live on, the more opportunity we get to know other cultures and the more open our tastesbuds to other culture's foods. We are all lucky with that opportunity.

  11. Heidi - Apples Under

    I so wish to try Ethiopian food! There are a few restaurants in Melbourne, but I have to travel far to get to them, so I have never eaten it. I must book it in! I really enjoyed this post, thank you!Heidi xo

  12. Heidi - Apples Under My Bed

    I so wish to try Ethiopian food! There are a few restaurants in Melbourne, but I have to travel far to get to them, so I have never eaten it. I must book it in! I really enjoyed this post, thank you!
    Heidi xo

  13. Pingback: Ethiopian Cooking Class | Indonesia Eats

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