Indonesia Eats

Calamansi and Grilled Ikan Tude with Dabu-Dabu Sambal

As I mentioned on my old posts, I was born and grew up in Java island of Indonesia. Most of the Javanese use key lime (jeruk nipis), kaffir lime (jeruk purut), jeruk limo (Citrus amblycarpa Hassk., nasnaran mandarin, leprous lime) for making sambal or reducing the smell of fish before cooking. So, I didn’t really know until my friends on multiply who are from North Sulawesi province told me about lemon cui long time ago. The first time, I wasn’t aware that Calamansi is what the North Sulawesi call for Lemon Cui or Lemon Cina while other parts of Indonesia call for jeruk keturi or jeruk kasturi until mbak Ima‘s post. She posted a recipe of Ikan Asap Sambal Matah. After reading her recipe, I had a suspicion that calamansi, lemon cui and jeruk kesturi are the same citrus. I have been using calamansi lots for substituting jeruk limo and jeruk purut (Citrus hystrix, Englsih: kaffir lime), such as making Pelecing Kangkung or just making es lemon cui (literally calamansi iced).

This citrus has been using in Filipino’s culinary as well as in North Sulawesi and East Kalimantan culinary. Two provinces of Indonesia where is close to the Phillippines.

Acording to http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/calamondin.html . The calamansi/ calamondin is believed native to China and thought to have been taken in early times to Indonesia and the Philippines. It became the most important Citrus juice source in the Philippine Islands and is widely grown in India and throughout southern Asia and Malaysia. It is a common ornamental dooryard tree in Hawaii, the Bahamas, some islands of the West Indies, and parts of Central America.

After reading all about calamansi, now it’s my turn to share a simple Manadonese’s recipe using calamansi; Grilled Ikan Tude with Dabu-Dabu. Ikan Tude is what the Manadonese called for Ikan Kembung while in English it’s called as Indian Mackerel. Don’t get confused one I say Manado and another one I say North Sulawesi. Manado is the capital city of North Sulawesi.

Thank you to mbak Rieke of Sexy Chef for the recipe. A different style of grilled ikan tude that I made, I just inserted sliced shallot in the fish. I found the different between using calamansi and lime for marinating fish. No fishy smell after marinating and cooking the fish with calamansi.

I’m sending calamansi and this recipe for my entry at WHB (Weekend Herb Blogging) # 112, hosted by Simona of Briciole. In Winnpeg, you can find fresh calamansi at Young market on Mc. Phillips.

Grilled Ikan Tude with Dabu-Dabu


Ingredients:
375 g Indian mackerel (Manadonese: Ikan Tude; Indonesian: Ikan Kembung)
1 shallots, finely sliced
1 tbsp fresh calamansi
salt as desired

Sambal Dabu-Dabu (Dabu-Dabu Sambal)
6 shallots, finely sliced
6 bird’s eye chillies, finely sliced
100 g tomato, diced
2 fresh calamansi, squeezed
sugar and salt as desired to season

Directions:

Grilled Ikan Tude
Preheat a grill pan.

Clean fish by cleaning out the stomach cavity, removing the gills and surrounding tissue, then clean well with tap water.

Cut several deep cuts on both sides of fish. Rub fish inside and over with salt and calamansi juice. Insert finely sliced shallots into deep cuts. Let stand for 15 minutes.

Grill fish until the skin lightly golden brown.

Sambal Dabu-Dabu (Dabu-Dabu Sambal)
Combine all ingredients for sambal.

Enjoy this fish with dabu-dabu and warmed rice


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33 thoughts on “Calamansi and Grilled Ikan Tude with Dabu-Dabu Sambal”

  1. The citrus fruit looks like green kumquat! It sounds really good BTW!And thanks so much for educating us about yet another exciting Indonesian dish.

  2. dear pepywah enaknya makan ikan kembung, kalau di Indo, ikan ini ikan murah meriah enak.. kalau jeruknya mudah didapat, pasti lebih sering lagi ya masak makanan manado, makanan manado kalau kata saya itu fresh banget dan kaya bumbu..salam manisrieke

  3. The citrus fruit looks like green kumquat! It sounds really good BTW!

    And thanks so much for educating us about yet another exciting Indonesian dish.

  4. Makasih mbak Rieke…enak bangett rasanya. Meski ikannya beku tapi asli bakaran ikan yg dimarinate pake calamansi beda banget rasanya. Sambalnya segarrrr

  5. dear pepy
    wah enaknya makan ikan kembung, kalau di Indo, ikan ini ikan murah meriah enak.. kalau jeruknya mudah didapat, pasti lebih sering lagi ya masak makanan manado, makanan manado kalau kata saya itu fresh banget dan kaya bumbu..
    salam manis
    rieke

  6. Makasih mbak Rieke…enak bangett rasanya. Meski ikannya beku tapi asli bakaran ikan yg dimarinate pake calamansi beda banget rasanya. Sambalnya segarrrr

  7. hmmm, where did you get them? I can’t find any kalamansi here…sambal belacan is NOT the same without them. 🙁

    And Malaysian lemonade made with kalamansi…sigh.

  8. I guess Malaysian lemonade is like Manadonese lemonade using calamansi. Manadonese lemonade can be found at Manaodese restaurants in Indonesia.

    Anyway, I got fresh calamansi from one of Asian stores here.

  9. Laurie Constantino

    Andaliman, what is the taste like when compared to lemons or limes? I’ve seen cans of calamansi juice in our local Asian grocery, but never fresh. Very interesting postl

  10. Wow, didn’t know that calamansi can also be found in Indonesia. I love calamansi and it really makes a dish refreshing.

  11. I haven’t heard of seen this type of citrus fruit. Sounds very tasty though! Thanks for teaching us about something new (to me at least!)

  12. Laurie Constantino: It tastes closer to lime but has a bit orange taste as well
    said…

    Gay Carrillo:Calamansi is more popular in Eastern part of Indonesia that is close to Southern Malaysia and the Phillipines.

    Kalyn: You should try then, it’s very refreshing.

  13. hihihihi…. cari gambar ikan kembung, malah nemunya diblog elo Pep :))

    btw, kalo yg kayak gini mah gue sering liat di toko Asia :))

  14. Wandering Chopsticks

    Ooh, I like the sound of the sambal. My mom sometimes substitutes limes with calamansi in Vietnamese dipping sauces so that looks right up my alley.

  15. I ate a lot of this Ikan Tude and Dabu-Dabu (also known as Rica) during my visit to Manado, Tomohon & Bunaken. Love the Dabu-Dabu where Kicap Manis is added. I always ask for more Dabu-Dabu. It's spicy and very appetizing ~ made me ate a lot of rice…ha ha. Thanks for this recipe. Now I can make this Dabu-Dabu for my family in Malaysia to try it.

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