Gulee Kameng Recipe (Aceh Goat Curry)

This Gulee Kameng or Gulai Kambing Aceh has some different names such as Gulee Sie Kameng, Kari Kameng, Kari Sie Kameng, and Kuah Sie Kameng.  Basically Gulee is what Indonesians call for Gulai; Sie is Daging or Meat; Kameng is Kambing or Goat while Kari is another different called for gulai or curry.  Kuah is an Indonesian term for any soup base dish.

After searching the perfect recipe of Goat Curry of Aceh style and learning some terms as I don’t speak the local dialect of Acehnese such as sie, kameng and gulee, I decided to go for a recipe of Kak Hasnidar‘s and Nangroe Aceh Darussalam community.

I should be proud of myself as I processed all the ground ingredients by using a mortar and pestle not with the help of food processor.  After smoothing all wet paste, the next morning my right arm felt sore.  LOL A sign of out of shape. Big Time!!!

To make this tasty gulee kameng, you will need toasted shredded coconut or known as u neu lheu in Aceh local dialect or kelapa sangrai/gongseng in Indonesian or kerisik in Malay. It happens that I won’t grate or shred my own coconut yet I hate the taste of dried coconut, I thawed my favourite brand of frozen coconut and toasted them.

I have tried some different brands of frozen shredded coconuts and Deep Dish is my favourite by far. It’s a bit more expensive but at least still taste like a coconut with no sour aftertaste.

Just like in India, curry leaves are common to be used in Aceh food. You will see the connection between Aceh food and Indian food when you go to through the ingredients.

There is another different between this Aceh gulai or curry with other Indonesian gulais or curries, the use of dried chilies instead of fresh chilies. Capli kleng (cabai kering) is the name for dried chilies in Aceh. You can always substitute the dried chilies with chili or red pepper powder. In this case I used crushed Korean red pepper. I also charred or broiled some spices to strengthen the aroma.

The recipe of Gulee Kameng or Gulai Kambing Aceh is my contribution for idfb #7 event with a theme “Indonesian Curry or Gulai”

Gulee Kameng (Kari Kameng, Gulai Kambing Aceh)
Aceh Style Goat Curry

Ingredients:
1 kilogram goat meat with bones or boneless, drizzle over key lime, rub all over and set aside
3-4 tablespoons crushed Korean red pepper, mix with a small amount of warm water
4 shallots (8 pieces if you use smaller size), thinly sliced
2 stems curry leaves
2 star anises
4 centimeter cinnamon bark, toasted or broiled
4 cloves, toasted or broiled
2 green cardamom, bruised and toasted or broiled
4 lemongrass, take the white part and bruise
600 ml coconut milk
some of extra virgin coconut oil or vegetable oil

Spices for a wet paste:
6 tablespoons toasted shredded coconut
4 shallots
2 cloves garlic
1-2 Bengali red peppers (this Bengali red pepper is way hotter than long red cayenne pepper or cabai merah keriting)
2 tablespoons corriander seed, toasted
2 teaspoons white peppercorn, toasted
1 nutmeg
5 centimeter ginger, toasted and peeled
5 centimeter turmeric root, toasted and peeled
3 centimeter galangal, toasted
4 candlenuts
1/2 teaspoon toasted cumin powder
1/2 teaspoon fennel, toasted
1 tablespoon white poppy seed (kas-kas), toasted
seasalt as desired

Methods:
You don’t need to toast one by one. For the ingredients that you need for grinding, you can toast them together.

Grind all spices for wet paste until smooth. Use a food processor if you want to get a faster result but I prefer using the traditional Indonesian mortar and pestle.

Rub all wet paste over the goat meat. Marinate for more than 15 minutes. I myself kept them overnight in the fridge.

In a wok, dutch oven or pot, heat up your cooking oil. Stir fry slices of shallot until fragrant. Add curry leaves and red pepper powder mixture; stir. Toast in marinated goat, cinnamon bark, star anise, cloves, cardamom and lemongrass. Reduce the heat to medium cover the wok and cook until the goat meat changes colour.

Pour in coconut milk and season with seasalt; stir and let it cook until the liquid is thicken and oily. Taste. If you feel not enough salt, you can add more.

Remove from the heat and enjoy with steamed rice.

About the Author

An Indonesian born who lives on the Prairie land of Canada. Indonesia Eats is a memoir of her homeland.