Crah Boh Trueng (Aceh Style Stir Fry Eggplant and Long Beans with Asam Sunti)

Crah Boh Trueng

Crah Boh Trueng is an easy Indonesian vegan foods from Aceh region of Sumatra with Asam Sunti. Crah means stir fry or can be meant damage or broken. Boh means Fruit or Buah in Indonesian and Trueng means Eggplant or Terong in Indonesian. This dish that can be made for a vegan or pescetarian by adding ikan kayu (an Acehnese dried skipjack tuna).

Similar to other Acehnese dishes, Crah Boh Trueng will need Asam Sunti to give a little bit tart flavour. Asam Sunti is a sundried bilimbi (averrhoa bilimbi) or belimbing wuluh/sayur and coated with salt. For those who are new to my blog, please take a look my old post of Bilimbi and Asam Sunti where I explained more details regarding this ingredient.

The way of this dish is cooking reminds me of some traditional Sri Lankan foods that I watched on YouTube channel where all the ingredients are mixed prior to stir fry in a hot oil. Hence, no need to stir fry the shallot and garlic first then pour the rest of ingredients.

Crah Boh Trueng
Adapted from Novie Triana

Ingredients:
2 medium Asian purple eggplants, cut in 2-cm thickness and divide into 4
8 Chinese long beans, cut into 2-cm length
4 green chilies, angle-cut
2 lemongrasses, take the white parts only and mash
4 shallots, slice thinly
1 cloves garlic, slice thinly
seasalt to season
coconut oil
water

Spices to be ground
5 shallots
1 clove garlic
4-5 asam sunti (dried bilimbi), substitute with drizzled of lime or fresh bilimbi
4 bird eye chilies
4 long red cayenne peppers
2-cm length ginger

Directions:
1. Combine all ingredients except oil and water.

2. In a wok or pot, heat up the oil. Once the oil is hot, pour the mixture into the wok. Stir evenly.

3. Add a small amount of water. Cover the wok or pot with a lid. Cook for another 5 minutes.

4. Open the lid and taste it. Check if the eggplant is tender enough to your liking and correct the flavour with more seasalt if you need to.

*Cook’s Note: you can always reduce the amount of red chili or bird eye’s or green chili peppers according to your tastebuds.

About the Author

An Indonesian-born who lived in Winnipeg, Canada for more than a decade prior to move to Edmonton in 2017. Indonesia Eats is a memoir of her homeland.